Home Page Link Thaxted - under the present flightpath and threatened with quadrupled activity Takeley's 12th century parish church, close to proposed second runway Harcamlow Way, Bamber's Green - much of the long distance path and village would disappear under Runway 2 Clavering - typical of the Uttlesford villages threatened by urbanisation
Campaigning against proposals to expand Stansted Airport

image MAPS ARCHIVE

BAA SECOND RUNWAY OPTIONS
Submitted to the Department for Transport in March 2001

Option
Configuration
Mode
Hourly
PATM
capacity
Annual
PATM
'000
Annual
mppa
1
New runway 385m to NW, standby runway replaces existing runway
Seg
70
378
57
2
New runway 385m to NW, staggered to NE by 2500m
Seg
80
432
67
3
New runway 1800m to SE, staggered to NE by 3500m
Seg
80
432
67
4
New runway 2450m to SE, staggered to NE by 3500m
Seg
80
432
67
5
New runway 2450m to SE, staggered to NE by 3500m, three terminals
Mixed
95
513
82

BAA Option 1 for a Second Runway at Stansted
Current Situation Showing One Runway and One Terminal

BAA Option 1 for a Second Runway at Stansted
Option 1
This option would utilise the standby runway as a 2500m main runway and add a new 3500m runway on the north west side in close-parallel configuration. The present runway would become a parallel taxiway between the two. The close spacing dictates dependent segregated operation, and crossing movements would reduce potential capacity, although multiple simultaneous crossing would be facilitated by the intervening taxiway. Runway length difference would not affect the balanced distribution of traffic as the shorter runway would be used for arrivals in either operating direction. Estimated capacity is 57 mppa. Additional terminal capacity is in a core and satellite configuration, replicating the existing facility.

BAA Option 2 for a Second Runway at Stansted
Option 2
This option has the same runway separation as Option 1, but retains the existing full-length runway and staggers the new runway 2500m to the north east. This large stagger permits independent segregated mode; landings would be on the nearest threshold in either direction of operations. Crossing traffic could largely be eliminated as the pronounced stagger opens both runways to direct access from the terminal zones. Capacity would be a significant improvement over Option 1 at 67 mppa. As in Option 1, terminal capacity is in two core and satellite modules.

BAA Option 3 for a Second Runway at Stansted
Option 3
Option 3 places the new runway on the other side of the terminal area, giving a wide separation and an even greater stagger than Option 2. Operation in independent segregated or mixed mode would be feasible, but there is not enough land area between the runways to accommodate stand and terminal capacity to support potential mixed mode throughputs. This option is therefore assumed to operate in segregated mode, and its capacity would thus be the same as Option 2.

BAA Option 4 for a Second Runway at Stansted
Option 4
The separation between the parallel runways is increased to 2450m, with the same large stagger as in Option 3. As in that case, segregated or mixed mode operation is possible. While in Option 4 there is a greater depth of land available to accommodate terminal and stand capacity between the runways, this would still require large areas of land acquisition. This option was therefore limited to segregated operations, restricting it to a similar capacity to Options 2 and 3. The additional site depth is used, however, to fit in an efficient back-to-back two-terminal layout.

BAA Option 5 for a Second Runway at Stansted
Option 5
This option is essentially the same as Option 4 in runway layout terms but is operated in mixed mode. This enables full advantage to be taken of the land area enclosed between the runways for terminal/apron development. There are three terminal units, which would each have to be capable of handling up to 35 mppa. Estimated capacity of the runway layout in mixed mode is 82 mppa.


RADAR MAPS FOR STANSTED

These two official radar maps (one for each direction of operation) show where the planes really go and, although of course there is no indication of height, the intensity of the red is a pretty good indication of which areas suffer noise. The maps show a pretty good correlation with the areas making complaints to the Stansted noise line - unlike the official dBA Leq maps.

Radar Map of Arrival Flight Paths with Planes Landing from the NE
Radar map of the actual arrival flight paths at Stansted between 1st and 3rd May 2003 with planes landing from the North East direction
Radar map of the actual arrival flight paths at Stansted between 1st and 3rd May 2003
with planes landing from the North East direction

Click here for a larger version of the above map

Radar Map of Arrival Flight Paths with Planes Landing from the SW
Radar map of the actual arrival flight paths at Stansted between 1st and 5th April 2003 with planes landing from the South West direction
Radar map of the actual arrival flight paths at Stansted between 1st and 5th April 2003
with planes landing from the South West direction

Click here for a larger version of the above map


Proposed M11/A120 Link Road
for Two or More Runways at Stansted

Map
View a larger colour version


Noise Maps for 4 Runways at Stansted
(Still a Threat)